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Diagnostics

Fluorescein and indocyanine angiography
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Testing the condition of the retinal vessels. After a contrast is added to the vein and special filters are applied, we obtain information about the condition of the major and minor retinal vessels, and pigmentation or neoplastic changes.

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Autokeratorefractometer
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Computer sight testing. Testing the refraction of the eye and the corneal strength in the main optical axes.

Used routinely in ophthalmological examinations.

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Biometry LENSTAR
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Measuring the length of the eyeball and the structure of the eye. Used among others for  assess the progression of near-sightedness.

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Confoscan
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One of two devices in Warsaw, and very few in Poland, for live testing of the functioning of the cornea. The confoscan examination allows us to determine the state of the cornea before and after ophthalmological operations. We can archive photographs from the Confoscan, which makes it easier to observe a long-term patient after various eye operations.

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Diagnosis Demodex
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The test takes a few minutes and involves microscopic examination of eyelashes or epidermis taken from the patient. When enlarged, it is not hard to notice this parasite and differentiate the stages of its development. This test us particularly important for patients who suffer from loss of eyelashes, red, irritated eyelid edges, inflammation of the eyelids, or relapsing chalazoin.

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Gonioscopy
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Filtration angle test. Routine for all patients whom we diagnose with glaucoma.

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Colour photography of the eye
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On 13 March 2014 we introduced a new diagnostic imaging test. We can photograph the anterior section of the eye (conjunctiva, pupil, iris) and the inside of the eye. This is an excellent supplement to the medical documentation monitoring the changes or progress in the treatment of eye diseases. The photograph is taken with the aid of a special camera fitted in the slit lamp, and the patient then receives the picture on a digital carrier. This test is painless and non-invasive.

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Colour photography of the eyeground
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Assessing the progression of changes in the eyeground, archiving data. When photographing the eyeground, the examination is carried out after dilating the pupil. This test is painless and non-invasive.

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New: electrophysiology
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Electrophysiological examinations serve to assess the functioning of the retina, optic nerves and visual system. They supply valuable data when making a diagnosis and controlling the treatment of many ophthalmological and general diseases which produce symptoms in the eyes.

We differentiate three basic types of electrophysiological examinations:

  • electroretinographic (ERG) and electro-oculographic (EOG) examinations enabling information to be obtained about the functioning of individual layers of the retina
  • visual evoked potential test (VEP) enabling an assessment of the functioning of the visual system from the macule through the optic nerve, the visual system to the visual cortex in the brain

The examination is painless. A monitor displays the appropriate pattern or flashes of light are sent to stimulate the eyes. By applying special electrodes to the patient’s scalp or eyeballs, the signal from the eyes is transmitted to an analyser and displayed on the monitor. In the case of ERG and EOG tests, this signal comes from individual layers of the retina, allowing us to detect and recognise which diseases affect even individual cells. The visual evoked potential test is a record of the electrical activity of the brain, and more specifically the visual cortex – the part of the brain responsible for receiving visual stimuli. In layman’s terms, the results of the examination informs us whether the visual route from the eye to the brain is working properly, and whether the brain is receiving the visual signal properly from the eye.

Basic indications for electrophysiological examinations are:

  • sudden blindness or loss of visual acuity without any visible changes in the eyeball, disturbances in colour, twilight or night vision.
  • changes in the field of vision (including those of indeterminate causes, in patients with suspected glaucomic damage, with general diseases such as high arterial pressure, cardiac ischaemia, generalised arteriosclerosis)
  • assessment of neurological conditions (multiple sclerosis – diagnosing attacks and monitoring the course of the disease, brain circulatory disorders – ischaemic changes, aneurysms, neoplasts of the eye socket or brain, toxic damage to the optic nerve or visual centres, post-traumatic states) suspicion of hereditary retinal diseases, even at the stage where there are no visible changes in the basic ophthalmological examination. An assessment of the advancement of retinal damage in patients with visible changes to the eyeground and/or previously diagnosed dystrophy, or retinal degeneration and monitoring the progress of the disease (assessment of the chances of retaining sight during the illness, whether dystrophy genes are carried, examining children from families genetically predisposed – this enables early detection of the disease and appropriate direction of the child’s schooling and professional career)
  • assessment of the condition of the visual organ before a planned operation to remove cataracts or a vitrectomy in patients with non-transparent optic centres in order to forecast the improvement in visual acuity
  • assessment of the activity of the visual organ in a post-traumatic, post-operative, non-operative state (e.g. meningioma of the optic nerve), in chronic illnesses or those requiring long-term therapy with drugs which are potentially toxic for the visual organ.
  • detection of diseases in the pre-clinical stages (e.g. damage to the optic nerve as a result of thyroid ophthalmopathy when visual acuity is still good), in order to start treatment early enough to retain sight
  • assessment of the degree of sight loss and forecast of any improvement in visual acuity
  • determining visual acuity and diagnosing patients who are uncooperative due to their age, arteriosclerosis, mental disorders, mental retardation, unwillingness to cooperate in the examination and more time has to be allocated to the examination, it may be necessary to dilate the pupils (it is worth bringing sunglasses). Because of this, vision may be weaker immediately after the examination (ERG). It is best to bring along your collected ophthalmological documentation, especially field of vision test, OCT optical coherent tomography), fluoroscein angiography and information about visual acuity. You will receive detailed information regarding preparation for the examination while registering for it.
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OSA – Comprehensive eye surface and tear analyser
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Meibography is an examination which describes and assesses the number of active Meibomian glands producing the lipid layer of tears, which is responsible for protection against the evaporation of the aqueous layer.

N.I.B.U.T (non-invasive tear film break-up times) is a non-invasive (contactless) measurement of the time it takes the tear film to break up. This parameter allows the stability and integrity of the tear film to be assessed.

Interferometry is a test measuring the thickness of the fatty layer of tears.

Its stability and effectiveness in limiting the evaporation of the aqueous layer depends on its thickness.

Tear Meniscus is a measurement of the height of the lacrimal prism forming between the eyeball and the edge of the lower lid – its height indicates the size of the aqueous layer of the tears.

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Pachymetry
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Testing the corneal thickness.

This is done when diagnosing glaucoma, when implanting intracorneal rings, and in degeneration of the cornea.

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Perymetry
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Testing the field of vision. An assessment of the space seen by the immobile eye is applied in diagnosing glaucoma, diseases of the optic nerve, and damage to the central nervous system.

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Diabetology clinic
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The Diabetology Clinic began functioning on 28 August 2018, providing comprehensive care to diabetics.

The consultant doctor is Prof. Paweł Piątkiewicz MD.

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Applanation tonometry
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Eyeball pressure test. Routine ophthalmological test.

The test can be expanded to cover corneal thickness. It enables an assessment of the actual intraocular pressure, eliminating observational error caused by the cornea being too thick or too thin.

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Topography of the anterior and posterior surface of the cornea – Galilei
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The first apparatus of its kind in Poland.

It enables precise viewing of all the cornea’s surfaces. A device enabling the front (as in the topography) and back surfaces of the cornea to be viewed helps us to diagnose patients with keratoconus, among others. This examination is also carried out in patients with a so-called thin cornea (e.g. before laser correction).

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Corneal topography (map)
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Assesses the front layer of the cornea. Enables detection of irregularities (astigmatism, keratoconus), describes the shape of the cornea.

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USG in UBM projection
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Enables a precise viewing of the anterior section of the eyeball.

This examination is used in diagnosing retinal and conjunctival diseases, monitoring the post-operative condition of the cornea, the condition of the iris, detecting lumps in the front part of the eyeball, changes in the retina and choroid, post-traumatic changes, glaucoma, and also for controlling the settings of implanted lenses (after cataract surgery, replacement of natural lenses with artificial ones, and implantation of phakic lenses).

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